How common is Alopecia Areata?

Alopecia areata affects 1 in every 500 to 1,000 people in the United States. It is one of many recognized forms of alopecia; alopecia areata is the second most common form after androgenetic alopecia (male-pattern baldness in men and female-pattern baldness in women).

What percent of people have alopecia areata?

Alopecia areata affects nearly 2% of the general population at some point during their lifetime.

Why is alopecia areata so common?

It is unknown precisely what causes the body’s immune system to target hair follicles in this way. While scientists are unsure why these changes occur, it seems that genetics are involved as alopecia areata is more likely to occur in a person who has a close family member with the disease.

Is alopecia areata permanent?

In alopecia areata, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the hair follicles for reasons that are not clear. Fortunately, the follicles retain their ability to regrow hair, and the hair loss is not permanent in most cases.

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Who is most likely to get alopecia areata?

Who is affected by alopecia areata? Alopecia areata tends to occur most often in adults 30 to 60 years of age. However, it can also affect older individuals and, rarely, young children.

Can alopecia areata go away?

Thankfully, mild cases of alopecia areata often get better without treatment within a few months to a year. In some cases, patchy baldness may come and go over many months or years. The size of the bald patch or patches and how long they last are quite variable.

Can you just develop alopecia?

When does alopecia areata begin? You can get alopecia areata at any age; however, most people develop it by 30 years of age. For many, the disease begins during childhood or the teenage years.

Is there any hope for alopecia?

There is currently no cure for alopecia universalis. Alopecia universalis is not contagious. Alopecia universalis does not permanently damage the hair follicles.

Is alopecia areata itchy?

Non-scarring alopecias associated with scalp itch include alopecia areata and androgenetic alopecia. Patients with active alopecia areata often complain of mild itching or burning, which often precedes development of new patches.

Can I pass alopecia to my child?

However, most children with alopecia areata do not have a parent with the disease, and the vast majority of parents with alopecia areata do not pass it along to their children.

Is Alopecia Areata caused by stress?

Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease. It develops when your immune system attacks your hair follicles. This may be triggered by stress, and it can result in hair loss.

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Does alopecia affect pubic hair?

Alopecia areata

If all of your body hair, including your pubic hair, is affected, leading to complete hair loss, it’s called alopecia universalis. Alopecia affects both men and women.

How often should you wash your hair if you have alopecia?

How Often Should You Wash Your Hair If You Are Balding? If you are experiencing thinning or balding, our Bosley experts recommend washing no more than three times a week.

What does alopecia look like when it first starts?

A common symptom includes small, round patches of hair loss on the scalp, beard area, or other “hairy” parts of the body. Those with alopecia may also notice hair loss and regrowth at the same time, but in different areas of the body. Hair may also only be missing from one side of the scalp and not the other.

How long can alopecia last?

How Long does Hair Loss Last? In half of patients with alopecia areata, individual episodes of hair loss last less than one year, and hair grows back without treatment. These patients may experience recurrent episodes of hair loss that spontaneously regrow or respond quickly to treatments.

How quickly does hair fall out with alopecia?

The hair loss occurring in telogen effluvium tends to be more rapid than in the case of androgenetic alopecia. The instigating factor or event typically occurs 2 to 4 months prior to noticeable hair loss, and the shedding lasts between 2 and 4 months.